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Old 09-01-2017, 09:42 AM   #11
Roger

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I'm not a carbon or epoxy guy so others may chime in that are more expert on those materials. I've done a ton of infusion with polyester and vinylester and glass laminates. The three keys to infusion that I was taught are viscosity, permeability, and pressure.

You've got to have a low viscosity resin. Typical laminating polys are about 600-700 CPS. Infusion resin should be down in the 125-150 range.

Your material need to be permeable. Resin has to have a space to flow to. Most materials will allow some flow but when you are working against the clock, having material designed for infusion is a big plus.

I'm sure you already know about pressure, or more accurately pressure differential. If you didn't, we wouldn't be talking about infusion.

From the looks of things, I'd say your biggest problem is viscosity. Permeability may play a part as well but if you are not flowing across flow media then my guess is your resin is not suitable.
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Old 09-01-2017, 05:37 PM   #12
petey1549

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Here are some photos of what I was working on.

I ran into an interesting situation on that last attempt and was able to actually salvage the effort with mostly luck.

The resin stalled about 4 inches from the edge of the enkafusion mat. I was a little puzzled by this (and still can't confirm what happened). In desperation, I released the vacuum enough to poke a small hole in the bag at the edge of the stalled resin front. I snaked a length of spiral tubing attached to another feed line into the bag and around the edge of the resin saturation line. Pulled the vac. again and infused another batch of resin. This time it raced around the laminate and infused completely in a few minutes. Completely saturating the remaining laminate before the resin gelled.

I haven't completely figured out why the difference in results, but theories include the original feed line somehow getting sealed off at the enkafusion mat. Whatever the issue was, the resin flowed and saturated the laminate so quickly and completely on the plan B infusion, I suspect viscosity and permeability may not have been the original problem (I had suspected that as well).
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Old 09-01-2017, 05:41 PM   #13
petey1549

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So the part was a "success" in that I ended up getting it completely infused. I'll make a few adjustments for the next try and see if I can get closer to an actual satisfactory result from end to end. Thanks for the tips!
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