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Old 05-02-2017, 11:16 AM   #11
Zebra

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Originally Posted by Hanaldo View Post
100% agree.

I would actually give it a go, I do like trying different products, but CE are a bit of a paint to deal with, at least for me here in Australia. They are pretty reluctant to ship stuff to me, and when they do the shopping costs are huge. I could probably get a meter of the stuff without too much drama, but I hardly see the point knowing that it would be such a hassle if I liked the stuff and wanted to get larger quantities.

Prefer to deal with companies that like to deal with me.
I know first hand about the costs of shipping to Australia from America. I've shipped projector screens there for my home theater business. Some of the quotes I got for shipping a 55" or 60" tube were $800-$1000+. I eventually gave up on shipping abroad because it cause so many issues for me.

It would only be worth importing if you could buy a lot in one go. Maybe they'll make you their distributor for the region...

I love Australia . It's one of the best countries I have been to and I've been all over the world. I had such a great time there. It was easy to understand why so many people want to move there.
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Old 05-02-2017, 06:46 PM   #12
Hanaldo

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Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
I understand the price , it's not always about price..... But saying you " don't rate it" makes it sound like crap. Which we both know is not the case at all and probably the tightest and best made carbon fabrics you can buy on the market with quality pretty unmatched from any other avalable from any suppliers in australia.
I agree for big flat type area's normal fabric and some spray is fine , as I said stacking 20 or 30 cut templates is hard to beat weave set stuff.
I love to get a link to where you get your regular carbon please , I'm certainly interested in getting some for my fill layers that's for sure.

Cheers

Tim
Yeh my comment about not rating it wasn't due to the price, that was just a separate comment. But we are really just getting too much into my own opinions here, which is why I didn't say too much about it.

Honestly the reason I don't rate commercial set-weave fabrics is because I find they lose too much conformability. I don't see the point in having a twill weave fabric that can't shape nicely without relief cuts.

The way I use spray tack to hold the fibres together is to only do it where I need to make cuts, and the rest of the fabric is left as is. That way you get almost the same conformability as a regular twill, but the cut edges don't fray.

But honestly, these are just my opinion, you're quite right that there's nothing wrong with the fabric on its own merits. It just doesn't suit my purposes and so I don't rate it.

I can certainly see why if you were making 30-40 templates for simplish moulds, then it would be great. I think for me, I only use dry fabrics for larger parts (so over 1200x600) or very simply small parts like flat sheet, glove box lids, etc. I don't template for parts that big, it's a pain in the ass. For anything smaller that has the complexity to require templating, I use pre-preg.
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Old 05-03-2017, 07:44 AM   #13
Zebra

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The Weblock product has much better conformability than other stabilized fabrics I have tried. That's also their marketing message and the reason they are making a big deal about their new stabilizing process.

I was able to make it conform to a fairly complex mold with tight sharp corners. Granted, I was using compression molding (my preferred method for complex shapes) but it did the job. I haven't tried it with a regular bagging process but I am fairly sure it would work.

The conformability is obviously not as good as non-stabalized fabric but, even with regular fabric, I always need something to hold it in place for smaller details. It's not like regular 2x2 twill just stays in place on it's own in a tight corner.

I have definitely had issues with other stabilized products though. I agree that it loses the benefit if the fabric is too stiff to conform to your mold.

My experience so far is that the Weblock product allows me to do more and not less. This is because it's so tough that you can force it into tight corners without disturbing the weave. It you try to do that with regular fabric, there is a good chance you'll seperte some of the weave on the surface layer and / make it look less tidy.

They have a video of a guy handling the Weblock fabric on their site to show how it bends and how you can try pulling it apart without damaging it. It's a good video. It was enough to peak my interest anyway.
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