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Old 01-18-2009, 11:39 AM   #1
X2guy

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Default Duratec primer finish

Am I beating a dead horse trying to get duratec primer to lay down nice and smooth so that very little if any sanding and polishing is required?
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Old 01-18-2009, 02:32 PM   #2
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Am I beating a dead horse trying to get duratec primer to lay down nice and smooth so that very little if any sanding and polishing is required?
Kind of.

You can thin it with laquer thinner which is all that "duratec thinner" really is. No matter what you do though, it will never come out glossy. All you can do is learn to spray it with minimal orange peel. That will minimize the sanding time.
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Old 01-18-2009, 03:49 PM   #3
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Kind of.

You can thin it with laquer thinner which is all that "duratec thinner" really is. No matter what you do though, it will never come out glossy. All you can do is learn to spray it with minimal orange peel. That will minimize the sanding time.
It can come out like a nice paint job if applied properly. I recommend against using thinner.
With the Duratec surfacing primer, it helps a lot to use 25-50% high gloss additive.
I generally use an ES cup gun to cover large areas, and then sand with 400+ grit.
For tight areas that are difficult to sand, a paint gun is used and minimal sanding is needed later. But it's tough to cover large areas this way because of the short pot life.
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Old 01-19-2009, 10:48 AM   #4
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I know nothing about spraying, but I've found that you need a reasonably thick even coat for best results... too this, and you'll need a heap of sanding.
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Old 05-09-2011, 09:23 PM   #5
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Default Duratec surface primer shot with a cup/dump gun

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Originally Posted by TET View Post
It can come out like a nice paint job if applied properly. I recommend against using thinner.
With the Duratec surfacing primer, it helps a lot to use 25-50% high gloss additive.
I generally use an ES cup gun to cover large areas, and then sand with 400+ grit.
For tight areas that are difficult to sand, a paint gun is used and minimal sanding is needed later. But it's tough to cover large areas this way because of the short pot life.
TET, you are talking about the G100 dump gun, right?

What size/# nozzle are you using for this?

I have a prototype 10.5" wide by 72" tall carbon foil I will be using as a plug. Still fairing with West and Microlight filler. I'd like to Duratec both sides within the pot lfe. And, that gun really appeals to me for it's simplicity and easy cleanup.

...Which brings me to yet another question; How do you think the polished Duratec primer will hold up to actual use on my trimaran. Will only be in the elements/water while I'm sailing. It's a dagger style rudder blade. I don't mind the gray color. (At least it'll be shiny). I'll be using it after splashing a mold and while I figure out the epoxy/carbon infusion of my laminate schedule.

Any guidance is appreciated.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:36 AM   #6
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I spray Duratec surfacing primer using their thinner with a 2.5mm tip gun. And it will always have a slightly textured surface but not much different then automotive high build primers; it knocks down very quickly.

If you want it glossy you should try the Duratec glossy top coat. I recently did a project where I sprayed the high build primer then blocked to 120 grit then sprayed the glossy top coat (thinned and 1.8mm tip) and it came out with minimal orange peel. I did this to save time sanding, I could skip directly to 800 grit then progressively finer, compound, then polish.

The top coat is way less porous then the primer so it would probably hold up better in your application.

BTW – if you’re your spraying over west epoxy resin, they recommended to me to scotch-bright (I used grey) the surface with water before applying the Duratec. Their tech line was pretty helpful.
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:21 AM   #7
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What gun were you using? I'm not very experienced with spray guns and don't want to waste material, destroy a gun or make extra work for myself. Looking for easy to use and easy to clean. I do plan on shooting some gelcoat so the dump gun sounds great if it can do a reasonable job on primer, paint and perhaps some PVA.

I'm thinking the water & scotch-brite treatment is to get rid of the amine blush that surfaces from the west. I usually hit hardened west with a mix of water and denatured alcohol and wipe clean before I start sanding; good call, thanks shoe!
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Old 05-10-2011, 12:52 PM   #8
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I'm using gravity guns, not a dump gun. These have more controllable (adjustable) fan pattern which I find makes it easier to get even coats and fine finish. The gun I use depends on the material, for the high gloss coating (thinned) I use a cheap gun I bought from Homedepot which has the 1.8mm orifice. I use this same gun for PVA. For surfacing primer and gel I use large orifice gravity guns either 2.5mm or 3.0mm depending on viscosity.

I'm sure you could spray all those materials with a dump gun but I'm not sure about the finish you'll achieve. Especially using regular paint or PVA. Maybe the other guys have more experience with this.

Yep, it's to remove the amine.
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:42 AM   #9
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i recommend reducing the primer slighlty and saving yourself some money and buying the 14.99 gravity feed harbour frieght sells.

high air pressure and 75% fan pattern (4"-6" at 8-12") works great over larger areas. to get in tight corners i dot it in and turn the feed way down.

please wear a respirator with organic cartriges. this stuff can really do a good bit of damage to the organs and nervous system.

MEK works great to clean up but its super super bad to spray into the air and breathe in.

if your a novice i recommend a smaller tip size and starting with spraying it with a barely visible fan pattern. if you go in and dump it on with one coat youll orange peel it.
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Old 07-31-2014, 07:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TET View Post
It can come out like a nice paint job if applied properly. I recommend against using thinner.
With the Duratec surfacing primer, it helps a lot to use 25-50% high gloss additive.
I generally use an ES cup gun to cover large areas, and then sand with 400+ grit.
For tight areas that are difficult to sand, a paint gun is used and minimal sanding is needed later. But it's tough to cover large areas this way because of the short pot life.
I'd just like to verify this, because everywhere I look it appears as if the hi-gloss additive is listed as being meant for mixing with a gelcoat; there is usually never any mention of it being suitable to mix with Duratec's own grey surfacing primer. Is it possible? Can I add Duratec Hi-Gloss additive to Duratech Grey Surfacing primer if I'm looking to polish the final layer of my plug to a mirror finish?
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